Monthly Archives: June 2013

How to install ajenti (Similar to Webmin) on ubuntu 13.04 server

Ajenti is a simple open source web based administration tool for managing ubuntu servers and this is similar to webmin.This is having nealy 35 plugins to monitor different servers (Including HTTP,DNS etc).
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© ruchi for Ubuntu Geek, 2013. |
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MiniTube Adds Account-Free Subscription, Heads to Ubuntu Software Centre

MiniTube

MiniTube on the Ubuntu Desktop

MiniTube has been updated with a rather nifty new feature: account-free channel subscriptions.

Version 2.1 of the Adobe Flash-free desktop video player lets you directly subscribe to YouTube channels without needing to login with a YouTube account.

Even better for Ubuntu users, when a new video is available on a subscribed channel a notification bubble will appear.

This latest update also features the following changes:

  • VEVO video playback fixed
  • Faster startup
  • Improved playlist
  • Skipping to the next video now works on Linux

Heading to Ubuntu Software Centre

MiniTube 2.1 will be available to install from the Ubuntu Software Centre in the coming days.

App developer Flavio Tordini hopes that distributing updates directly via the Software Centre will allow ‘easier to install and more up-to-date Minitube for Ubuntu users’.

It’s important that I point out that the updated version will need to be installed manually. If you have an existing version of MiniTube installed, from either a PPA, .Deb or the Ubuntu repositories, you should uninstall it prior to upgrading.

MiniTube 2.1 is not currently live on the Software Centre, but we’ll let you know as soon as it is. In the meantime you can browse the source code on Gitorious.

MiniTube Source

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Half Life 2 & Sequels Turn Stable on Steam for Linux

Half Life 2, a popular first-person-shooter game made by Valve, has migrated from beta to stable release on Steam for Linux.

A Linux beta of the game has been available since May.

Half Life 2 is not alone in gaining stable status. Both episodes 1 and 2 of the sequel, as well as spin-off mini-game Half Life 2: Lost Coast also see their beta tags shaken off.

Worth Buying?

Having never played Half Life 2 (or any of its sequels) I can’t say whether it’s worth buying or not. It certainly seems popular with gamers on all platforms, and the enthusiasm for its Linux beta was intense.

Below you’ll find the trailer. If it tempts you, it’s available to buy on Steam for $9.99/£6.99.

Thanks to all who sent a tip in on this

 

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DNSTOP – Stay on top of your DNS Traffic

dnstop is a libpcap application (ala tcpdump) that displays various tables of DNS traffic on your network. Currently dnstop displays tables of:
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2nd-Gen i5-Powered MintBox Unveiled

mintbox 2

The second generation of the Linux Mint-branded mini-pc has been shown off.

The fanless MintBox2 boasts 4x the performance power of the original device by switching to an Intel i5 CPU. The original Mintboxes shipped with power-efficient AMD embedded APUs.

As with the original releases, the diminutive device is a rebranded version of a device in Israeli computing company Compulab’s line-up, namely their Intense PC model.

Specification wise MintBox2 sports:

  • Intel i5 CPU
  • Intel HD Graphics
  • 4GB RAM
  • 500GB HDD
  • Dual-Gigabit Ethernet

And the price? $599. That makes it a little more expensive than the 1st generation models, which started at $476, but for Mint die-hards looking to support their favourite distro, it might be a premium worth paying.

Release date yet to be revealed, but we’ll be sure to let you know as soon as we do.

The post 2nd-Gen i5-Powered MintBox Unveiled appeared first on OMG! Ubuntu!.

Mir To Ship As Default Display Server in Ubuntu 13.10

ubuntu20for20android20video20capture20-100012626-mediumMir is to ship as the default display server in Ubuntu 13.10, Ubuntu have today announced.

Canonical’s XServer replacement will be used to help power the Unity 7 desktop on devices with open-source graphics card drivers.

Unity 7 will run atop of XMir, an implementation of X that provides a compatibility layer that allows software, desktop environments, peripherals and multi-monitor setups designed for X to continue to work as expected.

But while Mir and XMir will be shipping in October’s release by default, not everyone will be able to use it.

Those with proprietary graphics card drivers installed (NVidia, ATi, etc) will instead be served with the traditional XServer windowing system as a fallback.

This fallback is necessary because, at present, GPU vendors don’t provide support for Mir/XMir in their binary drivers – a situation expected to be resolved by the release of Ubuntu 14.04 LTS next year.

Xmir is already able to run most desktop environments competently, including LXDE and KDE, as the following video shows:

‘Why Now?’

So why now? Why as default in Ubuntu 13.10?

‘Putting Mir front and centre on the Ubuntu desktop so soon is a risky move – but it’s also an unavoidable one…’

To meet the goal of shipping Mir as the only default in Ubuntu 14.04 LTS, and powering whatever Ubuntu handsets OEMs are looking to ship in the meantime, Mir (and XMir) need to be production ready as soon as possible.

So while putting Mir front and centre on the Ubuntu desktop so soon is a risky move it’s also an unavoidable one if it’s to succeed. Real-world usage will give developers stronger feedback to help in shaping, optimising and honing the feature.

As Canonical’s Olli Ries explained to me earlier today:

“Mir has reached a level of maturity in terms of quality and performance which allows us to make it a core component for Ubuntu 13.10. With its current design, we enable all dependent derivatives to run unmodified on top of this new stack.

Integrating Mir today gives Ubuntu one additional cycle to enhance performance and further integrate it in in order to have another first class Ubuntu LTS by 14.04.”

Mir was created to aid in Canonical’s convergent goal for Ubuntu – to have the same code running across smartphones, tablets and TVs. As form-factors scale so too must the display technology driving them; a lighter and more flexible solution was needed that that provided by existing projects.

XMir, which runs on top of Mir, and will front the Unity 7 desktop in 13.10, is used to provide backwards compatibility for applications and services that rely on X.

What This Means To You

Enthusiasm about the technology in this change aside, this change will actually mean little by way of visible changes.

Whether you end up using a Mir-powered desktop, or one using XServer, the actual desktop experience in Ubuntu 13.10 should be the same.

And, for most of us, that’s all that matters.

If you’re running Ubuntu 13.10 already and would like to get a head-start on trying Mir you’ll find all you need to know in this blog post.

The post Mir To Ship As Default Display Server in Ubuntu 13.10 appeared first on OMG! Ubuntu!.

Google Drive Linux Petition Now 10k Signatures Strong, Google Yet to Respond

Google Drive LinuxOver 10,000 people have signed a petition asking Google for a native Linux version of their desktop Drive client.

The petition argues that ‘no [computing] minority should be under represented’.

Desktop clients for Windows and Mac OS X allow users of the Google service to keep their files in sync with their desktops, while mobile clients for Android and iOS give on-the-go access, to uploaded files.

Google are yet to issue a formal response to the petition, either directly or to us.

Packaged Applications

At the time of Google Drive’s launch a Linux desktop client was mooted by the search giant. But since then little else has been heard.

But why? Google’s internal OS, nicknamed ‘Goobuntu’, is based on Ubuntu. Surely their own employees would benefit from a Drive client?

Short of any formal response speculation is all we have. So what’s the hold up?

Ignoring the reasonable concerns over fragmented file-managers, differing APIs between desktops, and a choice of toolkits to build in, the main reason for a delay could be to do with Google Chrome.

Google are making a big deal out of ‘Packaged Apps‘ for Chrome and the features they can offer.

Near-native, these apps are able to look and work like traditional native system apps – despite being written in the same technologies as web apps – thanks to privileged APIs giving access to system hardware.

With a packaged version of Google Music rumoured to be on the way – which is able to ‘watch’ music folders for new music – a packaged version of a Drive client could just meet the needs of Linux users.

Only tIme will tell – but adding more weight to the petition will surely fasten the answer.

Google Drive for Linux Petition

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How You Can Help Improve Linux Video Editor PiTiVi Right Now

PiTiVi 0.15Does open-source video editor PiTiVi need improving? If so, in what way?

Those are just two questions that the team behind the tool are hoping you can help them answer.

A short multi-choice survey is asking PiTiVi users, as well as those who would use like to use it, where they think development resources should be focused.

Do you favour fancy effects over stability? Or would you rather have support for multi-camera editing and automatic audio sync?

The team behind the editor hope that by asking the people who use the software what they want to see added will ‘help make Pitivi a better tool’ for all.

Hit the link below to take the short survey. Answer as honestly as possible and when done be sure to pass the link on to anyone else you think would be interested.

Take the PiTiVi User Survey

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Extra Games Added to Humble Bundle with Android 6

We’re one week into the latest Humble Bundle offer – the sixth in their  ’…with Android‘ series – which means it’s extra bonus games time!

Three extra games have been added to the Humble Bundle with Android 6:

  • Point & click fun with McPixel
  • ‘Action Gardening’ game Waking Mars
  • Physics-based puzzler NightSky HD

The addition of these brings the total HBA6 line up to 9 games – plus an Android-only exclusive.

All titles are available for Android, Windows, Mac, and Linux, and can, should you wish, be redeemed via Steam.

Getting The Extras

Already bought this bundle? You can get the new games by visiting your Humble Bundle download page (linked to in your receipt).

If you’re yet to buy this bundle you’ll need to pay more than the average price (hovering around $5) in order to get the full line up.

Humble Bundle Website

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2ping – A bi-directional ping utility

2ping is a bi-directional ping utility. It uses 3-way pings (akin to TCP SYN, SYN/ACK, ACK) and after-the-fact state comparison between a 2ping listener and a 2ping client to determine which direction packet loss occurs.
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